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Hypericum perforatum – St John’s Wort

St John’s Wort – Hypericum perforatum blooms with its halo of bright yellow flowers at the time when daylight hours are at their longest. Named by early Christians after John the Baptist, whose birthday is celebrated on June 24th when the plant is in full flower.
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Salvia officinalis – Sage

Wisdom and old age are the themes woven into Sage's healing history. The ancient Greeks considered Salvia to bestow immortality, partly due to its ability to cure so many ailments; it was also thought to have the power to enhance inner wisdom.
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Plantago lanceolata – Plantain

Native to Eurasia, Plantain is a hardy little plant that will settle in areas where there has been much disruption by humans; it will continue to grow happily whilst being trodden underfoot. Native Americans knew the herb as 'white man’s footprint' as it seemed to appear wherever the settlers colonised.
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‘Devolution’ or ‘Evolution’ in Health and Medicine?

Year 2016, fertility is declining. For couples who can conceive parenthood is tough - the rate of childhood disease is rising rapidly: childhood diabetes, mental health disorders and developmental disorders are all increasing. An alarming 1 in 40 boys (one in 125 girls) are now affected with autism.
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Polycystic Ovary Syndrome

Polycystic Ovary Syndrome, one of the most common causes of infertility affects up to 12% of women of reproductive age. It is a complex disorder – not just causing infertility; hormonal imbalance causes irregular or absent periods, excess body hair, acne and weight gain.
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Male Fertility

For couples trying to conceive, reduced fertility can be a source of great anxiety. A low sperm count or poor sperm quality is the cause of infertility in around 20% of couples in the UK, and in an additional 25%, it is a contributory factor.
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Winter Warmers from The Herbal Clinic

The pleasures of winter: brisk walks, snuggling up by the fire, a time of darkness to look inside ourselves and reflect. A multitude of viruses love the cold conditions too; however, bacteria and viruses will only thrive if the condition of the body is right.
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Ginger: Zingiber officinale

Pungent, warming and sweet; ginger is one of the most versatile herbs, in cuisine and medicinally. Originating in southern Asia, it was not until the Middle Ages that it began to be used widely in Europe and its popularity became second only to pepper.
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Chicken Noodle Soup Recipe

Ingredients for Chicken Noodle Soup: 2 medium onions 2 garlic cloves, crushed 2 medium carrots 2 large sticks celery 1-2 cups of shredded roast chicken (leftover scraps from a roast…

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Chicken Stock

The easiest way to make chicken stock is with the carcass of a roasted organic chicken. Strip off any unused meat from the carcass and refrigerate for later use. Put…

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Marsh mallow: Althaea officinalis

The name ‘Althaea’ comes from the Greek ‘altho’ - 'to heal'; Marshmallow has a long history of medicinal use. The herb has soothing properties and old herbals used to refer to the root as 'mortification root', highlighting the ability to rid the body of putrefied or morbid matter.
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Equisetum

Equisetum is the sole survivor of the Equisetales family; huge tree-like plants that thrived 400 million years ago. Traditionally, medical herbalists have valued the herb for its effect on the urinary system and it is particularly useful in formulations for the treatment of urinary tract infections.
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